0861 IRON MTN (0861 476 668)

DVD Data Storage Technology

The History of Data Storage Technology – Part 6

Data Storage Technology (1995)

 

DVD data storage was invented in 1995 by Philips, Sony, Toshiba and Panasonic and has been, for over a decade, the standard format for distributing digital video, replacing VHS. DVD has also been a popular solution for storing a wide range of file types and most modern desktop and laptop computers come with DVD drives.

DVD formats include:

  • DVD-ROM (Read only, cannot be written or erased)
  • DVD-R & DVD+R (Read and record once)
  • DVD-RW, DVD+RW & DVD-RAM (Rewritable)

DVDs offered two notable improvements over CDs, firstly they had a significantly higher capacity, and secondly they had a faster read/write speed.

Most DVDs come in the single-sided, single-layer 4.7 GB storage size; this is more than 5 times the 700 MB size of CDs. Other less common sizes made available include the 8.7 GB single-sided, double-layer format, and the 17.08 GB double-sided, double-layer format.

Though DVD data storage no longer offers sizable storage capacity when compared to the newer Blu-ray disc or the long serving hard drive they are nonetheless still popular due to their affordability. DVDs also offer a high degree of longevity. While manufacturer claims of up to 100 years have not been proven, tests carried out have indicated data integrity can be maintained for between 15 and 45 years depending on the type of DVD used.

For many years, DVDs have been employed by companies and individuals as a means of data storage and transfer and continue to be used for the distribution of digital video.

As with all technology, things progress, Iron Mountain is at the forefront of data storage technology and can provide custom solutions to businesses large and small. Contact Iron Mountain today for fast professional service.

 

View the Timeline

The-History-of-Data-Storage-Technology-Timeline---Special-Feature

 

Image Credit: “Dvd-burning-cutaway3” by Felipe La Rotta – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dvd-burning-cutaway3.JPG#/media/File:Dvd-burning-cutaway3.JPG